Contrary to ICMR's August 15 deadline, Science ministry says 'no COVID vaccine before 2021'
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Contrary to ICMR's August 15 deadline, Science ministry says 'no COVID vaccine before 2021'

The Ministry of Science and Technology on Sunday said that none of the Covid-199 vaccines may be ready for mass use before 2021. The statement is in contrast to ICMR's claim that said it "envisages to launch the vaccine for public health use latest by August 15, 2020 after completion of all clinical trials". More than 140 candidate vaccines are under various stages of development. One of the leading candidates is AZD1222 developed Jenner Institute of University of Oxford and licenced to AstraZeneca British-Swedish multinational pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Cambridge, England. Parallelly Indian institutions have also engaged in R&D for the development of vaccines in India. With the primary scientific inputs coming from institutions like Pune based ICMR institution National Institute of Virology and Hyderabad based CSIR institution Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology, six Indian companies are performing on a vaccine for COVID-19. Convict in 1984 anti-Sikh riots case dies of coronavirus. Along with the 2 Indian vaccines, COVAXIN and ZyCov-D, the planet over, 11 out of 140 vaccine candidates have entered the human trials. None of these vaccines is unlikely to be ready for mass use before 2021. Antigen from the pathogen and antibodies produced by the human immune cells can be thought of as matching the compatible pair. Every pathogen has specific molecular structures called as antigen. They are like the surface with a particular hue and design. Once infected by the germ, the human immune system develops antibodies that match the antigen. Just as the retailer of design matching material stockpile hundreds of design pieces of riots of colours and hues, our immune system has ten thousand types of antibodies. If the pathogen is a known enemy, the immune system can pull the matching design piece from the stock. Once the match is made the pathogen is inactivated.


No longer it can infect. However, if the microorganism is unfamiliar, and mainly when it has evolved for the first time, there is no matching colour and hue in the repertoire. Nonetheless, unlike the textile, the antibody can evolve. At first, near matches are tried. After various cycles of antibody development, the best fit matures. The time lag between the identification of the main surface colour that is an antigen, and finding a pairing design piece, that is antibodies, is what makes the infection mild or severe. If only the immune system can neutralise the germ instantly, the infection can be prevented.

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